This area showcases articles and resource areas online that illustrate the importance of airside economizing. If you would like to have your articles posted, email us.

Status of State Energy Code Adoption

Model building energy codes and standards have the potential to save U.S. consumers an estimated $330 billion by 2040. This equates to 93 quads of cumulative full-fuel-cycle energy savings and 7 billion metric tons of avoided carbon dioxide emissions. View the BECP’s national benefits assessment for more information on the benefits of building energy codes.

Energy Research and Development Division

FINAL RESEARCH SUMMARY REPORT
Prepared for: California Energy Commission
Prepared by: New Buildings Institute
Contact: Mark Cherniack, Senior Project Manager

The economizer is the first thing the contractor will disable, due to complexity versus benefits. If it costs $500-$1,000 to fix it, the choice will be made to disable rather than repair it. This is due to a lack of knowledge regarding the value of energy savings and a price for energy that does not compel action. The economizer is more likely to get fixed if the customer knows and values the energy that can be saved.  Read on.

Belimo ZIP Economizer unit is designed to provide easy set-up and offer the most energy savings through advanced economizer logic strategies.  The ZIP Economizer is compliant with the most recent energy codes and standards (ASHRAE 90.1-2010, IECC-2012, California Title 24-2013, ASHRAE 189.1-2011). The ZIP Economizer reliability and features mean economizers no longer have to be jump out or fixed closed and results in getting building energy efficiency back on track.

New Building Institute

Commercial Rooftop HVAC Energy Savings Research Program
Prepared by:
Mark Cherniack – Senior Program Manager
Howard Reichmuth PE – Senior Engineer

This document summary, the results of part of the Commercial Rooftop HVAC Energy Savings Research Program which included four interdependent elements: 1) bench testing of economizer controls, 2) field testing of repair protocols, 3) devising an appropriate measurement and verification (M&V) approach and 4) developing a savings prediction methodology based on prototypical buildings. These elements are intended to lead to the development of a reliable field repair protocol with a higher level of confidence in the associated energy savings. Read on.

Keep in mind with the ZIP Economizer accurate sensors – you don’t have to know the correct setting, just know put in your ZIP Code and the ZIP Economizer will make it accurate.

Review of Recent Commercial Roof Top Unit Field Studies in the Pacific Northwest and California

Prepared by: Alan Cowan, New Buildings Institute
Prepared for: Northwest Power and Conservation Council and Regional Technical Forum  

A total of 503 rooftop HVAC units, at 181 commercial buildings sites in 5 states were investigated between the four field studies. Economizers were failed or required adjustment on an average of 64 percent of the units for all of the studies.
Common failure modes include:
• Broken, frozen or missing drive system components
• Outside air or mixed air sensor failure
• Faulty repairs
• Low changeover temperature setpoint
• Use of a single-stage cooling thermostat

Estimates of energy savings associated with repairing a failed economizer range from 14 to 40 percent of the cooling energy between the different studies. The low-end estimate is for adjustments to a functioning economizer and high-end estimate corresponds to repairing a broken economizer. Read on.

ENERGY STAR Building Upgrade Manual Chapter 8: Air Distribution Systems

The Building Upgrade Manual is a comprehensive guide to profitable energy efficiency upgrades presented in an easy-to-understand framework designed especially for ENERGY STAR partners.
This 27-page chapter addresses:
•    Air-handling system types
•    Air-handling components
•    Best opportunities

Read on.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information Known as SciTech Connect

Economizer system cost effectiveness: Accounting for the influence of ventilation rate on sick leave.
Authors:    Fisk, William J.; Seppanen, Olli; Faulkner, David; Huang, Joe

This study estimated the health, energy, and economic benefits of an economizer ventilation control system that increases outside air supply during mild weather to save energy. A model of the influence of ventilation rate on airborne transmission of respiratory illnesses was used to extend the limited data relating ventilation rate with illness and sick leave. An energy simulation model calculated ventilation rates and energy use versus time for an office building in Washington, DC with fixed minimum outdoor air supply rates, with and without an economizer. Sick leave rates were estimated with the disease transmission model. In the modeled 72-person office building, our analyses indicate that the economizer reduces energy costs by approximately $2000 and, in addition, reduces sick leave. The financial benefit of the decrease in sick leave is estimated to be between $6,000 and $16,000. This modeling suggests that economizers are much more cost effective than currently recognized. Read on.

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide Retail Buildings

Citation
Liu G, B Liu, J Zhang, W Wang, RA Athalye, D Moser, E Crowe, N Bengtson, M Effinger, L Webster, and M Hatten.  2011.  Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide Retail Buildings.  PNNL-20814, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA.

Abstract
The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide for Retail Buildings is a component of the Department of Energy’s Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides for Existing Buildings series. The aim of the guides is to facilitate a rapid escalation in the number of energy efficiency projects in existing buildings and to enhance the quality and depth of those projects. By presenting general project planning guidance as well as financial payback metrics for the most common energy efficiency measures, these guides provide a practical roadmap to effectively planning and implementing performance improvements for existing buildings.
Download the Document

Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide Office Buildings

Citation
Liu G, B Liu, W Wang, J Zhang, RA Athalye, D Moser, E Crowe, N Bengtson, M Effinger, L Webster, and M Hatten.  2011.  Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide Office Buildings.  PNNL-20761, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA.

FORMAL REPORT
Abstract
The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide for Office Buildings is a component of the Department of Energy’s Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides for Existing Buildings series. The aim of the guides is to facilitate a rapid escalation in the number of energy efficiency projects in existing buildings and to enhance the quality and depth of those projects. By presenting general project planning guidance as well as financial payback metrics for the most common energy efficiency measures, these guides provide a practical roadmap to effectively planning and implementing performance improvements for existing buildings.
Download the Document

Commissioning HVAC Systems Can Reveal Ways To Save Energy And Money

Learn how saving energy through better building operation starts with finding opportunities in areas that have been shown to have the most frequent problems and the potential for the greatest benefits. Read on.

Office Outside Air Economizers

Spend $1,000 now and SAVE $278 each year… ROI = 27.8%

Many commercial HVAC systems have an economizer feature. This brings in outside air for cooling when it’s cooler than the air inside. Since many offices do not have operable windows, this is the next best alternative. Economizers save energy, which is important as Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning account for 49% of an office’s annual energy costs, but more importantly for your empolyees, it will bring more fresh air inside. The climates that are ideal for economizers are the ones that have summer nighttime temperatures that drop down relative to the daytime temperatures. It’s often cool enough outside that an economizer can effectively be used frequently. Read on.